Stakeholders

Research

The value of street experiments for mobility and public life: Citizens’ perspectives from three European cities

‘Street experiments’ (SE) temporarily reallocate street space from traffic to people. Existing research often evaluates SE from upscaling or public acceptability perspectives, but few studies explore what citizens value about SE in everyday life. This paper addresses this gap by analyzing how 458 citizens value five SE parklets and plazas in London, Munich, and Bologna. Using an inductive, qualitative survey method, it identifies valued mobility and public life dimensions, considering use value and social meanings. The findings show citizens prioritize SE’s public life benefits—enhanced streetscape, public space availability, and social interaction—over active mobility benefits. This framework aids understanding citizen evaluations and informs better SE design.

Show more…
Guidelines

StreetEcho toolkit: a how-to guide

StreetECHO Toolkit Guidance provides an overview of the tool and guidance for the engagement of citizens in street transformation. It initially explores concepts underpinning the development of the toolkit, particularly examining streets as convivial public spaces and the imperative of bringing citizen perspectives and knowledge into discussions on street planning and design processes. In emphasising the need for participatory processes, the report highlights the development of accessible digital tools as crucial pathways towards achieving these goals. After reviewing a series of such existing tools, the document introduces the novel StreetECHO toolkit, highlighting its added value and innovative features, and instructing readers on how it’s utilised.

Show more…
Guidelines

Assessing experiments: Citizens perceptions and values

This report presents results from a study that examines citizens’ perceptions and values regarding street experiments in three European cities: London, Munich, and Bologna. The aim of the research was to understand how citizens value different dimensions of street experiments and to provide insights into the design of effective and inclusive street interventions. The study posits that by understanding and incorporating citizens’ values and preferences, practitioners can design street experiment initiatives that are more effective, inclusive, and aligned with the needs and aspirations of the community.

Show more…
Research

How Does Pedestrian Accessibility Vary for Different People? Development of a Perceived User-Specific Accessibility Measure for Walking (Paws)

Current accessibility measures often overlook the diverse needs of different user groups, leading to a mismatch between calculated and perceived accessibility. This paper proposes a new method that accounts for individual perceptions and walkability needs, developing Perceived user-specific Accessibility measures for Walking (PAWs) for seniors, children, women, and wheelchair users. By adjusting the Geo Open Accessibility Tool (GOAT) and using the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP), the most important walkability attributes are incorporated and weighted. Results from Munich reveal a nuanced understanding of pedestrian infrastructure, aiding urban planners in creating more inclusive, equitable environments that enhance quality of life and access to amenities.

Show more…
Research

Connecting people and places: Analysis of perceived pedestrian accessibility to railway stations by Bavarian case studies

Walking is crucial for connecting transport modes and accessing public transport. However, pedestrian accessibility to railway stations is often only measured by distance and time. This study examines factors influencing perceived pedestrian accessibility, addressing gaps between calculated and perceived accessibility. The literature review identified six key criteria: directness, simplicity, traffic safety, security, comfort, and built environment. Surveys in five Bavarian towns assessed these factors’ importance, revealing comfort, safety, and security as critical. Significant differences emerged between age groups and city sizes, highlighting the need for nuanced understanding in planning pedestrian access.

Show more…
Tools

StreetECHO

StreetECHO is a comprehensive open-source toolkit designed to facilitate stakeholder engagement with communities in the transformation of urban streets, emphasising the importance of diverse citizen perspectives, experiences, needs, and values related to city streets. This toolkit comprises a suite of tools including a data collection survey and a street mapping tool for documenting individual perceptions of street transformation. It also features a dynamic data visualisation tool, allowing users to navigate and engage with aggregated data in real-time. Additionally, StreetECHO offers a detailed workshop protocol for community engagement workshops, ensuring inclusive and effective participation.

Show more…
Research

The value of street experiments for mobility and public life: Citizens’ perspectives from three European cities.

“Street experiments” (SE) reallocate street space from traffic to people through temporary interventions. Existing research often evaluates SE from upscaling or public acceptability perspectives, but few studies explore what citizens value in SE. This paper fills that gap by analyzing responses from 458 citizens about five SE parklets and plazas in London, Munich, and Bologna. Using an inductive and qualitative survey method, we identify ten value categories spanning functional, social, safety, environmental, and economic dimensions. Findings reveal that citizens primarily value SE for enhancing public life, attractiveness, and social interaction over the benefits of active mobility. Our framework aids in understanding qualitative evaluations and designing effective SE interventions.

Show more…